A Camel, A Needle, and Religion in Europe

I think we’ve invested too much attention on water, orphanages and third-world missions.

Wait, too bold?

Ok, let me try again. I think we’ve invested too much attention on water, orphanages and third-world missions.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s not that those are bad things. I think they are absolutely essential. In fact, I have the highest, highest regard for those who have given their lives to live in places where living is difficult, and who take care of the “least of these” in obedience to Jesus.

So maybe I stated it too strongly before. Maybe we’ve given the right attention to medical missions, human trafficking campaigns, and evangelism in tribal cultures. But we’ve under-appreciated the needs in other developed parts of the world.

Why is it that in America, we talk about “taking the gospel to where it’s needed the most?” Isn’t it needed everywhere, and needed by all people, as the first three chapters of Romans would suggest? Furthermore, why is that statement usually code for “where people are poor?” Usually that statement means the urban ghettos in our country or the trash-heap slums of Mumbai, India. Somehow we have tied a string that connects stuff to “not needing the gospel as much” and lack-of-stuff to “needs the gospel.”

I’m not trying to villainize, here. This is a common mistake. We see the hardship people go through and we are moved to action by the struggle to live comfortably, or at all. Our hearts break for parents losing kids, kids losing parents, epidemics, starvation and oppression. I’ve never been on a mission trip to the developing world, so I’m on the outside looking in, but it seems like everyone I know that has comes back and says their own version of:

“I thought we would go and share Jesus with them, but they understand faith in such a tangible way that they shared Jesus with me.”

See, to some extent, the people who are in the deepest poverty understand the gospel at a much more tangible level, because their lives are not as comfortable and they don’t make the correlation between gospel and wealth. Simply put, they know what it means to really trust God from day to day because they have nothing else. Meanwhile, the developed nations—especially those in Europe that are officially Christian—have fewer and fewer Christians in them. They get very little missionary attention because we assume that churches on every corner and a relative level of wealth equals, “reached by the Gospel.”

The reality is that Jesus talked about this very issue, and he told his disciples, “it is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God.” Wealth (personal or federal) does not salvation make. My fear is that we’ve decided that it does. Maybe those that “need the gospel most” and those “who have the most needs” are not the same group.

So consider this a plea. A plea to remember our brothers and sisters that are doing mission work in Europe. A plea to pray for those that are not simply building buildings and bridges, but relationships and trust. A plea to encourage your church’s missions committee to “diversify” who you are supporting. And a plea to pray for those who have given up a life of comfort in the states to reach the lost for the gospel overseas, no matter where they may be.

#PrayForEurope

“The Bible” on the History Channel

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The Bible is a 10-hour epic miniseries on History Channel that portrays the Biblical narrative from Genesis to Revelation. It premieres March 3 at 8pm EST.

You don’t want to miss this.

In the weeks following this post, a good portion of America might actually be engaging in conversation about the Bible. Let that sink in. Your coworkers may watch. Conversation started. Maybe your kids may tune in. Ice broken. Maybe you even invite someone over to watch, or just invite them to watch. groundwork laid.

I’m talking, of course, about History Channel’s new miniseries on the Bible, produced by Reality TV mogul Mark Burnett, and his wife, Roma Downey. There has been a lot of press around this miniseries, hitting from all angles, to be sure. Without going into the critical analyses (especially having not seen it yet, myself), suffice it to say you cannot produce a 10-hour epic portrayal of the Bible without some push back.

God’s Word, The Greatly Abridged Version

But what should Christians think about such a series?

Glad for the conversation

As Christians, we ought to be very glad whenever discussions are started around what we believe. Heck, we ought to be thankful for conversations about the opposite of what we believe as well! People are about to watch the story of God’s chosen nation, Israel, and his loving provision for them. They will watch and learn about not just Jesus’ crucifixion but his resurrection. They may get a visual of what it means to be a disciple.

It’s time we just got excited about the conversation.

But what if it’s all “Hollywood?”

This is probably true. There will probably be inaccuracies. I’m sure there were some “punches pulled” so that various people groups wouldn’t be offended by the content (see this CNN writeup). But the real question is why are we trying to “punch” people with the Gospel?

It’s Hollywood! Ultimately, Burnett and Downey, as well as the History Channel and the A&E family of networks are after ratings! Liberties will be taken, stories that you and I might consider “crucial” will probably be left out. It is possible that this will be one big 2nd-grade Sunday School lesson, just portraying the biblical stories.

But they’re still portraying biblical stories.

So what do Christians do?

We embrace this, full force. This will be 10x more visually engaging than any sermon, and we live in a visual culture. We live in a world that loves story. To prove it, complete the following quotes:

  • Go Ahead, _____ ______ _____.
  • You had me at _________.
  • Life is like a _____ __ _________.

Most likely, you don’t just know the rest of the quote, but you can picture the scene, context and dialogue surrounding the quote. This is great for our culture.

When we do have conversations, we must “have an answer for anyone that may ask” about the Hope we have, the faith we claim. And we need to “do it with gentleness and respect.”

Let’s embrace this advancement of God’s Kingdom and use it to point people to Christ!

Bring Back the “R” Word

R-repent copyIt’s time we bring back the “R” word.

I know it’s controversial.

I know it’s hard to hear.

I know it’s offensive.

But it’s time we talk about it in openness and boldness. It’s about time we stop allowing ourselves to be offended by it. It’s long past time we stop applying it when talking about our own lives. But the word stirs up so much controversy that it’s almost impossible to avoid. It makes people angry. It breaks relationship. The word I’m talking about, of course, is “Repent”.

The first and greatest commandment.

We live in a world where people want to quote Jesus’ statement of the “first and greatest command: Love the Lord your God with all your heart and all your soul and all your mind and all your strength, and the second is like it, love your neighbor as yourself.” [emphasis mine] The way our culture talks, it seems “Loving your neighbor as yourself” comes first. Everyone wants people to be all lovey-dovey to one another. This makes for a world where no one can tell anyone that anything they do is wrong. In fact, it has created a world where nothing can be known to be right OR wrong.

This is bologna.

The first commandment is to LOVE GOD. And not just have nice feelings toward him, but to LOVE him, to LOVE his commands, to LOVE his plan for us and to LOVE, LOVE, LOVE that he has put a plan in place to redeem us.

Jesus’ First Message

Focusing on our love for God requires submission. And it requires admitting that I have a heart that wants so badly to resist him. It requires an admission that “I want to be my own god, and my default mode is denying you (the God of the Bible) that role.” That is why Jesus’ very first message was for his listeners to:

Repent, for the Kingdom of God is Near.

That’s right, Jesus, the orchestrator of Love and Acceptance, said that we are to REPENT! We are to turn away from the fact that we think we know better than God. It is to turn from the fact that we think we have evolved past needing him. It means to actually trust him with our lives, and not just go to church, while trusting our own instincts to take care of us.

Why this makes us squirm

This is a tough message because we don’t like to be told we are wrong. We also don’t like to think that we are not the one best-suited to guide our own lives. We all think that the truth is the best policy, until someone tells us the truth about how we are. We don’t want to hear that we are wrong, but that is the story of the Christian life.

Jesus said “Come as you are.” He never said, “Stay as you are.”

A life devoted to Christ says, “this is where I am, now shape me into what you’d like me to be.” In order to take that approach, we have to REPENT and turn from our old ways. We must turn from our pattern of thinking that says we know better than God. A life devoted to Christ gives him KINGship, not just SAVIORship.

And those who lose their [own] lives will find them [in Christ].

Why is it so hard for us to hear the word, “repent?”

The Gospel Lived Out [Video]

As I write this, I am speechless. I have spent the last half hour crying my eyes out and this video was the last pebble holding up the dam. Check it out:

New Film Premiere – I Like Adoption. from ILikeGiving.com on Vimeo.

The video is from a new campaign called I Like Giving. The mission of the site is not to get more of your money, but to get more people thinking — and acting — generously.

This site is one of the purest and most beautiful applications of the gospel message I have seen in a long time.

So click here to learn more, or sign up to give the idea a 3-day trial run! As for me and my family, we are going to write our own “I Like _______.” story (watch the promo video or the “I like bike” video to learn where the name came from. I can’t wait to hear yours.

Do you already have an “I Like ________.” Story? Share it below!