How Do I Become “Saved?”

[This week’s posts will be a continuation of a recent sermon at Adventure Christian Church, based on questions members submitted to our leaders. Some answers were not addressed from the stage and will be covered here as a supplement. Check out the live answers here.]

It happens all over our country, in many different contexts. Pastors who have a genuine heart for reaching the lost tell their audience or congregation to be saved by simply “accepting Christ into their hearts.” Continue reading

5 Ways to Protect Your Kids from Online Pornography (and other threats)

When my son gets a little older and starts playing sports, I think I’m going to give him a bottle of prescription pain pills.

I’ll tell him to use them responsibly, but what he does with them is his business. After all, he’ll be eight or so by then, and he needs to learn how to handle responsibility. Plus, considering pills are not damaging in themselves, it’s all in how you use them. I want him to make good choices, and people only learn from their mistakes, right? It’s the world they’re growing up in. Someday they’ll grow up and (in the “real world”) a doctor will prescribe them pills for pain. They need to know how to use them.

You’ve got to let your kids be their own people, after all. Continue reading

Solid!

Solid.

That’s my impression of every single missionary family I met last week. Simply put, they are solid people.

Solid in their convictions.

Solid in their life.

Solid faith.

Solid marriages.

Solid families.

Solid kids with solid faiths of their own.

Solid.

If I were starting a church, I’d want any one of them planting with me. I would want them as elders, and ministry leaders. When we worshiped, the singing was genuine, and when they would pray, it was bold and meaningful.

These people get it.

Enter the interesting paradox. Given the opportunity to describe themselves in three words, I doubt any of them would use the word “solid,” or any of its synonyms. There was a humility about them. It was one thing they all had in common. It was humility born of struggle and heartache. A bi-product of moving away from family, of feeling alone in a new culture.

As one minister put it, “When you get to a new culture, it’s very strange. The very essence of your calling, mission and job is communication, yet you can’t even ask anyone where the bathroom is.”

John [the apostle] recorded John [the Baptizer] as saying of Jesus, “I must become less, he must become more” (John 3:30). Then Paul proceeded to call himself the least of the apostles (1 Cor. 15:9), the least of the believers (Eph. 3:8), and the least of all sinners (1 Tim. 1:15). As his view of himself decreased, Jesus was glorified.

I think that is what has happened with these missionaries. Those that have stuck with it for the long term—who have struggled through being the new guy, struggled through learning a new culture, being worth very little (in a pragmatic sense) because of an inability to communicate, struggled through questioning the decisions they’d made, struggled through a life apart from everything comfortable, not to mention taking on the challenge of raising support from the generosity of others—those people have been humbled. They have become less, and their passion for the gospel has only grown stronger and stronger.

Growth only comes out of struggle. Life grows in the valley, regardless of how grand the mountain peaks may be. As one worship song says, “There may be pain in the night, but Joy comes in the morning.”

This isn’t to say they don’t have issues. Or sins to deal with. Or disagreements with spouses, church members and kids. This doesn’t mean their kids never run into trouble, or that everything is always hunky-dory. In fact, I got to see a few very small examples of some of these while I was with them.

Because they are real about it.

Because they aren’t shaken by it.

Because they have been through the fire and come out “without the smell of fire on them” (Daniel 3:27).

Because they are solid.

I want to be solid.

Why Millennials Are [Really] Leaving The Church

Oy.

What a debate this has turned into. A couple of weeks ago, an article by Rachel Held Evans on CNN’s Belief Blog went viral. Evans, a self-proclaimed adopted Millennial takes aim at the “attractional” church model that squeezes preachers into skinny jeans, strives for “hip” worship and puts coffee in the lobby.

Twenty-somethings nationwide wore out the “share” button. They stood up and applauded, and lauded Evans as the new voice of the new Christianity.

Out with the ways of our parents and grandparents, in with a new, “real” portrait of faith.

Now, I think Evans has articulated incredibly well what millennials want church to be. That is why it got spread so quickly. But—as a member of the generation myself—I must take some issue with some of her conclusions. The question is not, “did she convey the zeitgeist of our generation correctly,” but rather, “are the things our generation is seeking beneficial?

For example, take this statement from Evans:

“What millennials really want from the church is not a change in style but a change in substance.

We want an end to the culture wars. We want a truce between science and faith. We want to be known for what we stand for, not what we are against.

We want to ask questions that don’t have predetermined answers.

We want churches that emphasize an allegiance to the kingdom of God over an allegiance to a single political party or a single nation.

We want our LGBT friends to feel truly welcome in our faith communities.”

The aim of this post is not to offer a point-by-point criticism of Evans’ article. But creeds like this one are where I begin to feel uncomfortable. While I agree with what these statements say, I think if millennials were granted all these wishes, it would be detrimental to the Church. “Being known for what we are for rather than what we are against” is a great aspiration. Unless, of course, you are not actually against anything. In that case you are denying scriptural commands to “test every spirit,” (1 John 4:1) and other calls to be diligent in sniffing out false teachings (Romans 12:2; 1 Thessalonians 5:21; 1 Timothy 4:13, 15; Titus 1:8-11, 2:1).

Another problematic statement is that millennials “want to ask questions that don’t have predetermined answers.” The root cause of this comes from the fact that millennials have grown up in a largely post-modern and subjective world. In our reality, the world tells us that truth is relative and that personal experience is the ultimate authority in moral/ethical decision making. Biblical teaching, however, tells us that truth is objective, there is a God, and he has already spoken authoritatively through his word. In reality, the questions we ask have been asked – and answered ­– in the past, and biblically so.

The word “doctrine” comes from the Greek word meaning “to teach.” Therefore, doctrines are the teachings of the church. We shouldn’t be scared of having doctrines that have been thought out and scripturally backed. Why must we demand of the church that they act as if we are the first ones to struggle with the issue of homosexuality, or the balance of culture and holiness, or the need for social action? Why the arrogance that says, “We’ve finally got this figured out, and since the church won’t listen, we’re out of here.”

The arrogance comes from what I believe is the real reason millennials are leaving. Because they are human. Not only are they human, they are sinners. You. And Me. And all the millennials. And all the Pre-millennials. And all the post-millennials. We are humans who desperately struggle to submit to God because our egos get in the way.

When we get down to it, every generation – every person – wants a God that pats him or her on the back. We want a God that agrees with what we agree with and condemns what we condemn – a God who values our own areas of strength and condemns the areas in which others struggle.

This can be seen repeatedly throughout the biblical record. Approximately seven milliseconds after being rescued form Egypt, Israel cast shrines of gold in the form of a calf (“Make us gods who will go before us.” Exodus 32:1) in hopes that their gods would suit their needs. One author points out that Satan’s first deception was to suggest to Eve that “she knew as much about reality and morality as God did.[i] (Genesis 3:4-5) Jesus was crucified because he was the Messiah that was prophesied but not the one the Jews wanted. More recently, the products of the sixties and the Jesus People movement wanted hipper worship in their churches. Today we want acceptance of things the Bible clearly condemns and the freedom to begin our belief statements with “I kind of feel like . . . “

Evans, along with many Millennials, would connect the “Jesus” with “social justice” in some way. “Being authentic” to many means serving like Jesus served. And while I agree that the church can grow a great deal in this area, Jesus’ message was not just about social justice. His first words in ministry were, “Repent!” (Matthew 4:17; Mark 1:15).

Interestingly, Evans makes the statement, “We aren’t leaving because we don’t find the cool factor, but because we can’t find Jesus.” But is it possible that millennials are leaving because the Jesus they find is not the Jesus that would condone everything they think to do? Is it possible that the church portrayed in the Bible cannot be harmonized with the relativist, permissive church for which millennials are screaming? Could it be that our churches have done a fine job of bringing Jesus to the forefront, and that a young and one prideful generation after another just doesn’t want to be told what to do?


[i] Jack Cottrell, Solid! The Authority of God’s Word. WIPF and STOCK publishers. Eugene, OR, 1991. p. 85

Judge Not…Yeah Right

Being the pastor of a small church for the past year, here’s one I heard a lot: “Matthew 7:1 says, ‘Judge not, lest you be judged.'” In fact, it wasn’t just in that setting. Regardless of the setting, any time a discussion of value judgments and lifestyles comes about, someone in the conversation is quick to throw out Matthew 7:1. They may not know the difference between Matthew and Psalms, between Moses and Paul, but by golly, they have memorized Scripture, and the verse they chose to start with was “judge not, lest you be judged.”

Here’s the issue: no one lives this way. No one actually lives it out.

One of the most universally crucial skills in life making value judgments. We decide all the time to do what we calculate to be the best thing in a given situation. Despite the fact that this is reality, when people quote this verse, it is with a mentality that it is *wrong* (note inherent value judgment) to make any sort of judgment based on anything anyone else does, ever.

It’s a personal thing. It’s relative. Nothing is universally better than anything else, and to suggest so is equivalent to High Treason. But again, no one lives this way. Some things are just better than others. Let me give you some examples:

  • Clean is always better than dirty. You might disagree, but that doesn’t make the statement untrue. If dirty were better, people would “dirty up” when they have company coming over. But no one does that, because clean is better than dirty.
  • Nonviolence is better than violence. When stories of domestic abuse come out, no one rushes to the defense of the abuser. “You know, judge not. You don’t know what he meant by it. Maybe it’s how he shows he loves her.” Bull. No one assumes that. Because it is less virtuous to be violent than it is to express yourself through nonviolence.
  • Bravery is better than cowardice. No one ever honored a victim of a terminal disease by saying, “it was a cowardly and timid fight to the very end.” Rather, every fight against terminal illness is “strong,” “determined,” and “brave.” Why? Because even if it were true, the former would not honor the person, because bravery is better than cowardice.

When we were in Muncie I got drawn for jury duty. I was genuinely bummed when I was not selected to be on the jury, because a) I am a nerd, and b) I have enough of an ego to think I would have been an A+ juror. It’s okay to admit you feel the same about yourself!

As the lawyers questioned potential jurors about their responsibility should they be selected, I couldn’t believe how many had “religious objections” to what they were being asked to do. The task of a jury is to determine whether the defendant did in fact (in this case) possess what the District Attorney alleged she possessed.

Time and again what I heard was, “My religious beliefs tell me not to judge.”

Here’s where the insanity lies. The lawyers were not asking for a moral judgment of the person, but rather a decision on whether the person did, in fact, commit the crime. She did or she didn’t. The jury’s task was to determine the likeliness of that fact. NOT determine if she was a bad person because of it.

This is a poor interpretation of this verse that is damaging to our culture, and it is unreasonable to ask anyone to live it out. Jesus said, “Judge not…” but then he judged many people. He condemned sinful action and praised holy action. In the vast majority of his parables, he made a moral judgement upon the characters therein. In one instance, Paul told the Corinthians that he judged them for their passivity without even needing to be there to hear the case, and then told them to cast out the sinner in question. As Christians, we are told to be “wise as serpents,” to “be on our guard,” and to “test every teaching.”

Clearly, we are meant to judge.

So what does Jesus mean when he says, “judge not?” A better way to say it might be, “condemn not.” Don’t condemn someone. We don’t have the power to judge someone’s heart and say, “because of ___________ you are going to hell.” We also are not above any other people, and don’t have the standing to act like we are better than they.

The fact is, life necessitates value judgments. We do it with our kids all the time. You tell them what is good for them and what is not. Again, we are supposed to do this. We are supposed to challenge teachings that the world throws at us, and lifestyle choices and world views and philosophies! We are supposed to be “wise as serpents.”

But what Jesus himself would not do is to make the final judgment. He didn’t come to condemn the world (although he did make plenty of value judgments). God the Father will be the ultimate judge, and our job is to put our trust in Jesus because he is the only counsellor with access to the judge’s chambers.

Condemning George Zimmerman: Be Careful What You Wish For

I can’t believe I’m doing it. I promised myself I wouldn’t. I should just close my laptop and walk away. Resist the urge. Despite all my best judgment and a true desire to stay above the fray, I just can’t ignore the flood of terrible theology coming from supposed “Christians” in the wake of the George Zimmerman’s acquittal.

There is a LOT of anger out there over a life that ended too early. There is anger about injustice. I will not state my opinion here. What concerns me are the statements like the one Juror B29 made about the case this week:

In fact, there has been a very loud “God’s gonna getcha,” mob on social media and in the court of public opinion. Here are a few more:

God’s. Gonna. Getcha. Now if any Christian is angry about the verdict of this trial, this is the last thing he or she should be saying. It completely misses the point of the gospel. Think about what it is saying. “God is going to punish his sin with eternal Hell (what this argument is truly ordering for Zimmerman).” The problems are too numerous to count, but allow me to try.

First of all, it assumes Zimmerman’s guilt after he was found not guilty.

Second, it wishes eternal punishment on someone, which is exactly  the opposite of the kind of heart that Jesus calls us to have. Wishing someone literally go to Hell is the most hateful thing you could feel. Conversely, John writes, “If anyone says, ‘I love God.’ yet hates his brother, he is a liar. For anyone who does not love his brother, whom he has seen, cannot love God, whom he has not seen.” (1 John 4:20)

Third, despite the Catholic Church’s teaching on the “mortal” or “deadly” sins, there is no biblical evidence that any single sin can separate you from the grace of God. I know the concept of this special class of sins, of which homicide is included, is deeply ingrained in the moral foundation of many people’s hearts. It is part of the Ten Commandments. This poor theology, without biblical backing, stinks of mere moralism that suggests, “as long as I’m a pretty good person and avoid certain sins, I’ll be ok.” Jesus said, “You have heard it said, ‘Do not murder, and anyone who murders will be subject to judgement.’ But I tell you that anyone who is angry with his brother is subject to judgment.” In Jesus’ book, holding angry grudges against others is just as detestable as having the gall to carry out that grudge to its full logical conclusion.

Fourth, and most importantly, such moralistic views spit in the face of Jesus’ saving work on the cross and it stomps all over the gospel he asked us to spread. It ignores the fact that ALL sin is punishable by death. You don’t have to commit murder to live a life far from God. But let’s not forget that the sentence some are calling upon Zimmerman is the one that we all deserve.

Now let’s imagine

Let’s imagine that George Zimmerman really was guilty of racial profiling and coldblooded murder. Let’s imagine that you have no moral issue with wishing someone an eternity in Hell. Let’s assume that the doctrine of Murder as a deadly sin is accurate (even though not found in Scripture) and that there is a theological and moral basis to this “God’s Gonna Getcha” argument.

EVEN THEN, the gospel response is to “love your enemies.” EVEN IF you were convinced of all those things and you saw George Zimmerman as your enemy, the Christian thing to do is to serve him. To seek him out, to minister to him, to show him the grace that Christ has shown you.

We’ve got to challenge this “God’s Gonna Getcha” theology. It’s just not biblical — but more importantly — I am unspeakably thankful he didn’t “get me” when I lived a life opposed to him.

Addicted – Day 3

[I’m kicking caffeine to the curb. Follow along Day 1 Day 2]

Friday was day three of this journey. It was the best day yet. I had one cup of *gasp* coffee in the morning, at the insistence of a neighbor that had me into his home. How do you say no to that?

But that was it. Pretty good energy the remainder of the day, no headaches, although I hydrated like crazy!

The result: when you do the things your body was designed to do, you feel better!

The same is true of our spiritual formation (maturation): When we do the things we were designed to do, God’s blessings will follow.

At the risk of oversimplifying, we were designed to have a relationship with our creator. Diving headlong into this claim is a bit more ambitious a task than I care to take on here on the blog, but for a primer, read Deuteronomy 6:4-9, Matthew 6:33, Mark 12:30, and John 17:22-24. God designed us to seek him, to be in intimate relationship with him.

Coffee isn’t where we were designed to glean energy. As a result, seeking energy in the wrong places led to headaches and, ironically, depleted energy.

In the same way, we often seek to feed our spirit in places that are not designed for maximum fulfillment. We elevate things in our life to the place that is meant for God to the point of dependency. We let it all ride on our job, our family, our marriage, our fitness, and our spiritual happiness is determined day to day by how well those things fulfill our expectations.

None of those things (kinda like coffee) are bad in and of themselves, but they were never meant to have that much riding on them (again, like coffee). They are good things, but as many pastors have said before me, When a Good thing becomes a “God” thing, that’s a bad thing.

When we depend on other things to give us what a relationship with our Creator was meant to fulfill, we will be left feeling spiritually ill more often than not.

Caffeine Journal

  • Day: 3
  • Intake: 1 Cup of coffee (roughly 80-100mg of Caffeine)
  • Symptoms: Largely absent!
  • Weakness: I REALLY wanted an evening cup of something (anything!) in the afternoon/evening
  • In A Word: Progress

Have you ever quit an addiction? Share your story below!

Photo Credit: dsevilla via Compfight cc

Addicted – Day 2

[This is day 2 in a post about me kicking caffeine to the curb. Read the journey from the beginning.]

Today was MILES better than yesterday

But it was still pretty rough.

Today I was a substitute teacher in a gym class and it served as a great reminder that when we depend on the things that naturally create energy (such as exercise, in this case), it has a tendency to snowball in a cascade of positive effects.

Sure I had some headaches today, but they were not as bad and I didn’t notice them nearly as much.

That being said, I was a grouch today.

Paul said to the Church at Corinth, “I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.” (1 Corinthians 9:27)

When the Bible talks about fasting, the moral of the story is this: it is a good practice in learning to resist the desires your body has. It teaches you to say no to one of your most natural instincts (food), so that you can more easily say no to the things you desire that you are smart enough to know aren’t good for you. Dependence on Jesus for that resolve strengthens your faith in him in the tougher times.

Fasting is about “making your body your slave” instead of being enslaved to the desires of your body.

What’s more, it’s about finding JOY in that process.

The joy is where I struggled today.

Grateful for another opportunity tomorrow!

Caffeine Journal

  • Day: 2
  • Intake: 1 Cup of tea in the morning and one in the afternoon (roughly 100mg total)
  • Symptoms: VERY tired, and later in the day, headaches
  • Weakness: That 2:30 feeling
  • In A Word: (ok, in a phrase) Just Keep Swimming.

Photo Credit: Martin Gommel via Compfight cc

Men, What Do You Aspire To?

The Christian message of humility has led many men into a "ho-hum, I'm not good enough" brand of false humility. Meanwhile, the Bible's take on it is that men should actually desire and aspire to be leaders.

The Christian message of humility has led many men into a “ho-hum, I’m not good enough” brand of false humility. Meanwhile, the Bible’s take on it is that men should actually desire and aspire to be leaders.

1 Timothy 3:1 – “Here is a trustworthy saying: ‘Now if anyone sets his heart on being an elder, he desires a noble task.'”

Men, have you ever thought about being an elder in your church? Have you ever thought about helping to lead a group of Christians? Have you felt discontented with the way y0ur church is being run? Have you stopped to think that those may be biblical thoughts?

That’s right, you can desire to be an elder. In fact you can set your heart on it.

What about being humble?

Okay, so I know this may be a strange line of thought. But think about it. Why would someone set his heart on being an elder? Because it means he wants to see the church run well. He wants to see the Body of Christ exalt Christ, and be a beacon in the community. Probably 90% of suggestions pastors hear for their churches are ways that they could potentially improve their reach in their context. The church needs men in leadership that are passionate about the Church and want to see it operate in Christ’s mission faithfully. This has nothing to do with being arrogant vs. being humble. It has everything to do with your desire to see Christ glorified. If that is your goal, and not having a position of power, you need not worry about the humility question.

Do I just go to my pastor and say, “I want to be an elder?”

Perhaps. It actually might be a huge blessing to your pastor to have a candidate interested in performing the duties rather than men just filling a seat at the table. When that conversation happens, you need to be ready for the pastor to examine you before giving his blessing. The passage following the above verse lists the qualities of being an elder, and [spoiler alert!] it’s not an easy job description.

The idea in the passage is that elders live a certain kind of life in Christ. When you go to your pastor, his response shouldn’t be, “oh, really?!?” but rather, “I think you’d make a great elder!” The evidence of your candidacy comes from a life lived. You will already have authority amongst church members because of the way you are disciplined in knowing and applying God’s word. People will already come for you for advice because you seem to have the parenting thing figured out, or the marriage thing, or the financial thing. The life lived determines your authority. When you set your heart on being an elder, you set your heart on a higher standard for living. Such a standard will qualify you for eldership.

Nobility is tough

Let’s not breeze over the last part of the verse. Leading a church is a noble task. It is worthwhile. It brings with it a certain amount of favor in the eyes of men. It brings with it the opportunity to put plans into action. It also comes with a lot of responsibility.

Throughout history, when men are described as noble, it hardly ever means they took the easy road. When knights’ did noble acts, there is a high likelihood that pain, suffering and sacrifice were included. Being an elder is a noble task. It is hard. Yes, there is hard work involved and a sacrifice of time, but becoming an elder will also put the burden of other Christians’ maturity on your shoulders. That’s a heavy emotional load. Yes people may honor you, but you have a daily charge to deny the urge to let that intoxicate you. You have a call to adhere to the Bible and not culture in all situations. There is honor that comes with it, but only after great sacrifice and discipline.

Eldership is not a fast-track to having people validate you.

You don’t want the opposite

The last thing to point out here is that you don’t want the opposite end of this statement. Especially if you are a man and are reading this. You don’t want to live undisciplined. You don’t want to be greedy, or a belligerent brawler. Men have the amazing ability to think the most of themselves even when no one else does. We want to be excellent, and the life described here is an excellent way to live. Why wouldn’t you desire that? Why wouldn’t you set your heart on living a 1 Timothy 3 kind of life? Isn’t that ultimately at the heart of what manhood is?

How does your church determine its elders? Leave a comment below!

When Prayer Doesn’t Work

Many people over the years have felt like prayer is a waste of time.

Many people over the years have felt like prayer is a waste of time.

[This is the third installment in a series entitled, “When Faith Doesn’t Work.” Read the series from the beginning here.]

“National Day of Wishful Thinking”

A well-known YouTube atheist used this phrase to rename the National Day of Prayer. And protested said demonstration at his state’s capitol.

“Nothing Fails like Prayer”

Signs held outside the building showed just as much skepticism.

Christians hear arguments like this all the time and, if you are not a believer, you can probably sympathize with such sentiments.

Even believers have doubted the power of prayer. We struggle to “be good about prayer” in our own lives.

I know I do. So here are my thoughts as to why we might feel this way. These are the causes that lead to thinking prayer is broken, I see these mindsets in the arguments of non-believers (PLEASE COMMENT if you feel I miss the mark, forget something, etc.) but, sadly, I see just all of these as prevalent problems in the church as well. It’s no wonder prayer doesn’t “work.”

A Change In Our Definition

What do we mean, “prayer doesn’t work?”

Typically it means that we pray and bad things still happen. We pray and don’t “hear anything.” We may even pray for deliverance from sin and yet continue to be tempted.

Could it be that we are defining effective prayer wrong?

Even John the Baptist (who Jesus called the greatest man to ever live – Matt 11:11) questioned whether all his faith was “working” as he sat in prison and even questioned Jesus. He thought that because he was faithfully following God, prison should have been an impossible outcome.

Spoiler alert: He was later beheaded because of his ministry.

Prayer is not just some “magic trick” to fix all your problems. Prayer is an opportunity to grow in a personal relationship with the God that created the universe. It is an opportunity to share your heart with him, to tell him where your hang-ups and frustrations are, and to align yourself to his will for you. 

Prayer might not “work” because we expect something from it that is not promised in Scripture.

A Change In Our Request

Check out these popular verses about Prayer.

It would seem that Scripture paints a picture of prayer being answered. These passages definitely look that way. Didn’t Jesus say that if we truly believe, we could command a mountain to throw itself into the sea? When was the last time that happened?

There is an important caveat in passages like these though: “Whatever you ask in my name.” When we pray, we are often focused on ourselves. This was John the Baptist’s problem. “In my name” is a statement of submission to his mission above our mission.

We pray for God to heal people that we can’t bear the thought of living without. We pray for safe travel. We pray for a promotion. A job. The bid on that dream home to be accepted. Very seldom do we follow these things with, if it is your will.”

The above-mentioned list isn’t bad in itself, but they are self-focused. Comfort-focused.

Praying “Jesus, let your will be done” will usually follow with Jesus saying, “This is my will. Go let it be done.” A response is implied.

It could seem prayer doesn’t “work” because our requests are not “in Jesus’ name.”

A Change In Our Hearts

A heart that harbors hatred won’t hear Jesus.

1 Peter 4:17 – “Be self-controlled so that you can pray.”

Matthew 5:23-24 – “If you are coming to the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, leave your gifte there in front of the altar. FIRST, go and be reconciled to your brother; then come and worship.”

James 5:16 – “Confess your sins to one another and pray…”

Harboring sin in our hearts shows a lack of understanding of the Gospel. Being angry with someone that has wronged you shows that you don’t understand what Jesus has already done for you. Keeping secrets and hiding hangups in shame shows that you have a performance-based view of his love for you.

1 Peter says to stay self-controlled, because when we have sinned and feel ashamed, the last thing we want to do is pray. We don’t want God to see us in our imperfection. Sin separates us from God because of US. It makes us want to hide.

This is one of the reasons that we need to preach obedience. It is through obedience that we grow closer and closer to God.

It could be that prayer doesn’t seem to “work” because you are harboring sin, resentment or bitterness in your heart that is causing your heart to avoid God.

What have you noticed about prayer in your own life? Leave a comment below.